eagle-i The University of PennsylvaniaThe University of Pennsylvania
See it in Search
This page is a preview of the following resource. Continue onto eagle-i search using the button on the right to see the full record.

B6.129P2-Akt1 tm1Mbb/J

eagle-i ID

http://eagle-i.itmat.upenn.edu/i/0000013c-2657-9e59-f162-a2b280000000

Resource Type

  1. Mus musculus

Properties

  1. Resource Description
    "Mice that are homozygous for the targeted mutation are viable and do not display any gross behavioral abnormalities. Homozygotes exhibit lower fertility. Female homozygotes do not nurse well; up to 50% perinatal mortality can occur. No gene product (mRNA or protein) is detected by Northern or Western blot analysis of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Homozygotes are only 80% of wildtype body weight at birth, and remain small. This mutant mouse strain may be useful in related to organismal growth."
  2. Additional Name
    Akt1<sup>-/-</sup>
  3. Related Disease
    obesity
  4. Related Publication or Documentation
    Loss of Akt1 in Mice Increases Energy Expenditure and Protects against Diet-Induced Obesity
  5. Related Publication or Documentation
    Akt1/PKBalpha is required for normal growth but dispensable for maintenance of glucose homeostasis in mice
  6. Website(s)
    http://jaxmice.jax.org/strain/004912.html
  7. Parental Strain Name
    C57BL6
  8. Genetic Alteration(s)
    Akt1 KO
  9. Phenotype Findings
    Improved insulin sensitivity
  10. Phenotype Findings
    Protection from diet-induced obesity
  11. Phenotype Findings
    Decreased size
  12. Phenotype Findings
    Elevated energy expenditure
  13. Phenotype Findings
    Energy metabolism in skeletal muscle
  14. Location
    Birnbaum Laboratory
 
RDFRDF
 
Provenance Metadata About This Resource Record
  1. workflow state
    Published
  2. contributor
    fcoldren
  3. created
    2013-01-10T16:22:43.044-05:00
  4. creator
    fcoldren
  5. modified
    2013-01-29T15:18:39.683-05:00

Copyright © 2016 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College
The eagle-i Consortium is supported by NIH Grant #5U24RR029825-02 / Copyright 2016