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Advanced Optical and Force Microscopy Facility (Penn)

Summary:

The PMI has assembled a unique combination of microscopes for single-molecule-imaging and single-molecule-force measurements. Secured through funding from the NSF, NIH, NIST, University Research Foundation and PSOM, these state-of-the-art instruments are being used to address important biological questions, using purified macromolecules and in live cells. The instruments are only the starting point, as PMI investigators develop novel imaging technologies that will greatly impact future research and funding. Available directly to the Penn community are:

1) Optical tweezers instruments for the measurement of nanometer-scale displacements and picoNewton-scale forces, both used for measuring biological forces and manipulating objects in vitro and in the cytoplasm of live cells.

2) A Bruker Catalyst Atomic-Force-Microscope (AFM) for measuring nanoNewton-scale forces, and for imaging microfabricated surfaces.

The laboratories of PMI members also develop and utilize advanced technologies for measuring macromolecule dynamics and localization that may be accessed via collaboration. Unique multiwavelength total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopes provide millisecond-scale temporal and nanometer-scale spatial resolution of fluorescent molecules (e.g., GFP-proteins & quantum dots) in vitro and in vivo. In addition, polarization optics allow conformational changes to be observed in single molecules.

Affiliations:

People:

      Member: Ostap, E. Michael, Ph.D.
      Role: Director, Pennsylvania Muscle Institute, Professor of Physiology, Department of Physiology

    Resources:

    Instruments

    • Bruker Catalyst atomic force microscope ( Atomic force microscope )

      A Bruker Catalyst Atomic-Force-Microscope (AFM) is available for measuring nanoNewton-scale forces, and for imaging microfabricated surfaces.

    • Harrick tabletop plasma cleaner ( Plasma cleaner )

      for surface cleaning and preparation

    • Optical trap / Laser tweezers microscopes ( Optical tweezers )

      Optical tweezers microscopes for the measurement of nanometer-scale displacements and picoNewton-scale forces are available to Penn laboratories. These instruments are used for measuring biological forces (e.g., cell adhesion forces, protein-protein interactions, protein conformational changes, and other macromolecular associations) and manipulating objects in vitro and in the cytoplasm of live cells.

    • Single-Molecule Optical Trap, Sub-Pixel Tracking and Polarization Microscopes ( Total internal reflection fluorescence instrument )

      The microscopes were designed and built by the laboratory of Dr. Yale E. Goldman using modified Nikon TE-2000 and TE-I microscopes and Photometrics Cascade II and Evolve EMCCD cameras.

      Prism-type and objective-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscopes equipped with optics on the excitation and emission pathways for detecting changes in orientation and rotational mobility of single fluorescently molecules and for applying pN-level mechanical forces. The instruments are capable of tracking the 3-dimensional position of fluorescent molecules with nanometer-level precision in vitro and in live cells. Excitation and emission wavelengths are optimized for macromolecules fluorescently-labeled with probes in the visible wavelength range.

    Services

    • Atomic force microscope access service ( Access service )

      A Bruker Catalyst Atomic-Force-Microscope (AFM) is available for measuring nanoNewton-scale forces, and for imaging microfabricated surfaces.

    • Optical trap / Laser tweezers access service ( Access service )

      Optical tweezers microscopes for the measurement of nanometer-scale displacements and picoNewton-scale forces are available to Penn laboratories. These instruments are used for measuring biological forces (e.g., cell adhesion forces, protein-protein interactions, protein conformational changes, and other macromolecular associations) and manipulating objects in vitro and in the cytoplasm of live cells.


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    Last updated: 2015-02-12T15:50:18.612-05:00

    Copyright © 2016 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College
    The eagle-i Consortium is supported by NIH Grant #5U24RR029825-02 / Copyright 2016